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Food stories, cooking techniques and recipe collections from myfoodbook.com.au
Updated: 15 min 12 sec ago

Do you peel mushrooms before cooking?

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 11:52

Unlike other veg that you would naturally wash under running water or peel the skin away before cooking, mushrooms are quite different.

Due to the soft and porous nature of their flesh, you don’t want to wash mushrooms as they will take on the water content. You also don’t want to peel away their flesh, as the entire mushroom is edible and there is no reason to discard good food!

Do you peel mushrooms?

Instead of peeling or washing, use the method in the video above, which uses a cooking brush with dry bristles, to get rid of any light residue on the mushroom. Once you’ve cleaned the mushroom with a brush, you can slice according to your preference. In this case, for a flat mushroom, the best way to slice, is to cut off the stem, and stand the mushroom up on it’s flat side. Then simply slice lengthways and your mushroom slices are ready to be pan, fried, grilled or added to recipes like Nonna’s Bolognese or Grilled Mushroom Bruschetta.

This same mushroom preparation method of lightly brushing to clean, applies to all varieties of mushrooms. So whether your using cups, swiss or flats – give it a go!

 

 How to make Chicken Meatballs in a Creamy Mushroom Sauce: GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

 

Go vegetarian and use mushrooms to make a rich, creamy rage sauce.  See how easy it is to make this Mushroom Ragu with Creamy Polenta:  GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

 

Grilled Smoky Beef Burger a Mushroom Bun – Celebrate Health

 

Pumpkin Risotto with Mushrooms and Toasted Seed Sprinkle – Celebrate Health

 

Beef Stroganoff in Garlic Cob “The Cobanoff” – Western Star

 

Oven-Baked Chicken and Mushroom Risotto – Australian Mushrooms

 

Best Ever Mushroom Sauce by Australian Mushrooms:   GET THE RECIPE

 

*DISCLAIMER:  Australian Mushrooms is a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. All opinions in this article are our own. For further information on Australian Mushrooms,  visit http://www.australianmushrooms.com.au

 

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The post Do you peel mushrooms before cooking? appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Do you peel mushrooms before cooking?

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 11:52

Unlike other veg that you would naturally wash under running water or peel the skin away before cooking, mushrooms are quite different.

Due to the soft and porous nature of their flesh, you don’t want to wash mushrooms as they will take on the water content. You also don’t want to peel away their flesh, as the entire mushroom is edible and there is no reason to discard good food!

Do you peel mushrooms?

Instead of peeling or washing, use the method in the video above, which uses a cooking brush with dry bristles, to get rid of any light residue on the mushroom. Once you’ve cleaned the mushroom with a brush, you can slice according to your preference. In this case, for a flat mushroom, the best way to slice, is to cut off the stem, and stand the mushroom up on it’s flat side. Then simply slice lengthways and your mushroom slices are ready to be pan, fried, grilled or added to recipes like Nonna’s Bolognese or Grilled Mushroom Bruschetta.

This same mushroom preparation method of lightly brushing to clean, applies to all varieties of mushrooms. So whether your using cups, swiss or flats – give it a go!

 

 How to make Chicken Meatballs in a Creamy Mushroom Sauce: GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

 

Go vegetarian and use mushrooms to make a rich, creamy rage sauce.  See how easy it is to make this Mushroom Ragu with Creamy Polenta:  GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

 

Grilled Smoky Beef Burger a Mushroom Bun – Celebrate Health

 

Pumpkin Risotto with Mushrooms and Toasted Seed Sprinkle – Celebrate Health

 

Beef Stroganoff in Garlic Cob “The Cobanoff” – Western Star

 

Oven-Baked Chicken and Mushroom Risotto – Australian Mushrooms

 

Best Ever Mushroom Sauce by Australian Mushrooms:   GET THE RECIPE

 

*DISCLAIMER:  Australian Mushrooms is a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. All opinions in this article are our own. For further information on Australian Mushrooms,  visit http://www.australianmushrooms.com.au

 

SaveSave

The post Do you peel mushrooms before cooking? appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to thicken up any stew

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 07:00

No matter how many times you’ve cooked a certain stew, casserole or pie filling, sometimes you end up with a little more liquid than you’re expecting and the sauce is too runny.

This can happen more often with dishes made in a slow cooker, as slow cookers don’t allow water to evaporate – they trap in the moisture. At least with stovetop dishes, you can bring the dish to the boil to reduce some of the liquid, however this can affect the flavour and in most cases, overcook the ingredients.

With slow cooking season in full swing, we wanted to present you with some fail-safe ways to thicken up your casseroles so you can nail it every time.

The two best thickening agents are flour and cornflour. Both contain starch that swells when mixed with liquid and heated.

Using flour as a thickener 

Flour can be used in 2 different ways:

  • Toss it through meat pieces prior to browning. The flour helps to thicken a stew as it cooks.
  • Flour can also be whisked into a little cold water, before being stirred into the stew while cooking (don’t add the flour straight to the stew as it may clump). After adding to the stew, bring the stew to boil – this helps to cook out the flour taste and allows the starch to swell. Only add 1 tsp at a time.
Using cornflour as a thickener 

Cornflour is a great thickener for those who are gluten-free. Cornflour can produce a slightly more gelatinous texture, so only use a small amount or you may end up with a slightly goopy sauce. Unlike flour, you can stir the cornflour straight into the dish as it will dissolve more readily. Once added, bring to the boil and cook until desired thickness is reached.

Reduction cooking 

If you don’t like using flour or cornflour, a simple sauce reduction does the trick. Before you add your sauce to the heat remove the meat, as meat chunks will prevent a high-quality reduction. By simmering the liquid, you can thicken the consistency and end up with a more concentrated and intense flavour. The main trick to reducing in cooking is to give your liquid enough time to simmer in an uncovered pan.

Thickening slow cooker stews and casseroles 

The nature of slow cookers is that they operate at a lower heat, so this means any thickener may never get hot enough for the starch to swell. Once your stew is cooked, transfer the sauce only to a saucepan, stir in the flour or cornflour and bring to the boil. Or you can do the reduction method, as per the tip above.

 

 Stew and casserole recipes to try 

Indian Style Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks – Passage to India

 

Braised beef and beer with white bean mash – The Great Australian Kitchen

 

 

 

Pork Satay Hot Pot – The Good Nut

 

Beef Bourguignon – Wester Star

 

Lamb Shank Tagine with Pearl couscous – Foodbank

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

The post How to thicken up any stew appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to thicken up any stew

Tue, 05/05/2020 - 07:00

No matter how many times you’ve cooked a certain stew, casserole or pie filling, sometimes you end up with a little more liquid than you’re expecting and the sauce is too runny.

This can happen more often with dishes made in a slow cooker, as slow cookers don’t allow water to evaporate – they trap in the moisture. At least with stovetop dishes, you can bring the dish to the boil to reduce some of the liquid, however this can affect the flavour and in most cases, overcook the ingredients.

With slow cooking season in full swing, we wanted to present you with some fail-safe ways to thicken up your casseroles so you can nail it every time.

The two best thickening agents are flour and cornflour. Both contain starch that swells when mixed with liquid and heated.

Using flour as a thickener 

Flour can be used in 2 different ways:

  • Toss it through meat pieces prior to browning. The flour helps to thicken a stew as it cooks.
  • Flour can also be whisked into a little cold water, before being stirred into the stew while cooking (don’t add the flour straight to the stew as it may clump). After adding to the stew, bring the stew to boil – this helps to cook out the flour taste and allows the starch to swell. Only add 1 tsp at a time.
Using cornflour as a thickener 

Cornflour is a great thickener for those who are gluten-free. Cornflour can produce a slightly more gelatinous texture, so only use a small amount or you may end up with a slightly goopy sauce. Unlike flour, you can stir the cornflour straight into the dish as it will dissolve more readily. Once added, bring to the boil and cook until desired thickness is reached.

Reduction cooking 

If you don’t like using flour or cornflour, a simple sauce reduction does the trick. Before you add your sauce to the heat remove the meat, as meat chunks will prevent a high-quality reduction. By simmering the liquid, you can thicken the consistency and end up with a more concentrated and intense flavour. The main trick to reducing in cooking is to give your liquid enough time to simmer in an uncovered pan.

Thickening slow cooker stews and casseroles 

The nature of slow cookers is that they operate at a lower heat, so this means any thickener may never get hot enough for the starch to swell. Once your stew is cooked, transfer the sauce only to a saucepan, stir in the flour or cornflour and bring to the boil. Or you can do the reduction method, as per the tip above.

 

 Stew and casserole recipes to try 

Indian Style Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks – Passage to India

 

Braised beef and beer with white bean mash – The Great Australian Kitchen

 

 

 

Pork Satay Hot Pot – The Good Nut

 

Beef Bourguignon – Wester Star

 

Lamb Shank Tagine with Pearl couscous – Foodbank

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

The post How to thicken up any stew appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Ten 30-minute meals made with mince

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 23:50

What’s for dinner? It’s the same question that’s being asked in houses all around Australia at about 5pm. Thank goodness you have a secret weapon in the fridge: Mince. With mince, and these recipes, you’ll have a delicious dinner ready in no time. Bookmark this page ’cause you’ll want to refer to this article time and time again: Ten 30-minute Meals made with mince.

Mince cooking tips
  • Mince is best cooked in batches. This stops the mince from stewing, turning grey and losing its flavour.
  • Keep it hot: too much mince in the pan can over-crowd things, leading to the frying pan losing heat. Get your pan nice and hot before adding the mince in batches. Add a little more oil with each batch if needed.
Storing and freezing mince 
  • Mince can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 days.
  • Raw mince should be stored in the coldest part of your fridge, usually in the bottom corner.
  • If you’re planning on freezing the mince. Remove it from the store packaging once you are home and place it in a freezer bag or zip-lock bag with all the air squeezed out. Try to flatten the mince so it’s a thinner layer. This helps it to freeze faster and then defrost faster. Keep mince in the freezer for up to 2 months. Defrost mince in the fridge overnight.
Tips to faster meals

There are a few shortcuts to making a meals quicker and easier for those busy weeknights. Here are some used in the following recipes:

  • Opt for microwave rice rather than regular rice as it will be ready to use in just 90 seconds.
  • Use pre-cut frozen beans or other veg to save valuable prep time.
  • Choose mince rather than other cuts of beef or chicken as it will cook faster.
  • Use fresh pasta rather than dried as it is quicker to cook.
  • If you have sausages, cut them up to cook. Sausages are basically filled with flavoured mince. Plus they look like little meatballs.
Now try these ten 30-minute meals made with mince 1

30-minute Beef and Rice Burritos – Perfect Italiano

2

Grilled Smoky Beef Burger a Mushroom Bun – Celebrate Health

3


Chicken Meatballs in a Creamy Mushroom Sauce: GET THE RECIPE.

4

Cheesy Bolognese Jaffles – Western Star

5

Asian Chick-ado Patties: GET THE RECIPE.

6

Quick Sausage Pasta Bake –Perfect Italiano

7

Asian Chicken Meatballs with Noodles – Lilydale

8

Aussie Burger With The Lot – Australian Eggs

9

Chicken and Sun-dried Tomato Meatballs with Creamy Mustard Sauce – Western Star

10

Thai Basil and Chicken Fried Rice – Lilydale

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook,  third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post Ten 30-minute meals made with mince appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Ten 30-minute meals made with mince

Sun, 05/03/2020 - 23:50

What’s for dinner? It’s the same question that’s being asked in houses all around Australia at about 5pm. Thank goodness you have a secret weapon in the fridge: Mince. With mince, and these recipes, you’ll have a delicious dinner ready in no time. Bookmark this page ’cause you’ll want to refer to this article time and time again: Ten 30-minute Meals made with mince.

Mince cooking tips
  • Mince is best cooked in batches. This stops the mince from stewing, turning grey and losing its flavour.
  • Keep it hot: too much mince in the pan can over-crowd things, leading to the frying pan losing heat. Get your pan nice and hot before adding the mince in batches. Add a little more oil with each batch if needed.
Storing and freezing mince 
  • Mince can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 days.
  • Raw mince should be stored in the coldest part of your fridge, usually in the bottom corner.
  • If you’re planning on freezing the mince. Remove it from the store packaging once you are home and place it in a freezer bag or zip-lock bag with all the air squeezed out. Try to flatten the mince so it’s a thinner layer. This helps it to freeze faster and then defrost faster. Keep mince in the freezer for up to 2 months. Defrost mince in the fridge overnight.
Tips to faster meals

There are a few shortcuts to making a meals quicker and easier for those busy weeknights. Here are some used in the following recipes:

  • Opt for microwave rice rather than regular rice as it will be ready to use in just 90 seconds.
  • Use pre-cut frozen beans or other veg to save valuable prep time.
  • Choose mince rather than other cuts of beef or chicken as it will cook faster.
  • Use fresh pasta rather than dried as it is quicker to cook.
  • If you have sausages, cut them up to cook. Sausages are basically filled with flavoured mince. Plus they look like little meatballs.
Now try these ten 30-minute meals made with mince 1

30-minute Beef and Rice Burritos – Perfect Italiano

2

Grilled Smoky Beef Burger a Mushroom Bun – Celebrate Health

3


Chicken Meatballs in a Creamy Mushroom Sauce: GET THE RECIPE.

4

Cheesy Bolognese Jaffles – Western Star

5

Asian Chick-ado Patties: GET THE RECIPE.

6

Quick Sausage Pasta Bake –Perfect Italiano

7

Asian Chicken Meatballs with Noodles – Lilydale

8

Aussie Burger With The Lot – Australian Eggs

9

Chicken and Sun-dried Tomato Meatballs with Creamy Mustard Sauce – Western Star

10

Thai Basil and Chicken Fried Rice – Lilydale

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook,  third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post Ten 30-minute meals made with mince appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.