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Food stories, cooking techniques and recipe collections from myfoodbook.com.au
Updated: 44 min ago

Cook’s guide to passionfruit

Wed, 06/19/2019 - 08:00

It’s the fruit that’s synonymous with sunshine and pavlova but it’s in season and value for money now. Those tantalisingly tart bursts of passionfruit pulp cutting through a sweet meringue crust are what food dreams are made of. But passionfruit has so much more to offer in the kitchen. Read this cook’s guide to passionfruit to find out why we’re so passionate about passionfruit.

Plus check out the surprising health benefits you can enjoy.

How to select and store passionfruit 
  • Look for plump and heavy passionfruit
  • You don’t have to wait for a passionfruit to wrinkle before it’s ready to be eaten
  • A passionfruit will wrinkle because of loss of moisture
  • Skin blemishes rarely have any impacts on the flavour of the fruit inside so don’t be put off by by small scratches or marks
  • When you take your passionfruit home, if you live in cooler parts of Australian keep the passionfruit in the fruit bowl. In the warmers parts of the country store your passionfruit in the fridge
Benefits of passionfruit

As well as being high in fibre – yes, all those seeds make this little fruit pack a dietary fibre punch (on punch, try adding passionfruit to your next summer drink), passionfruit is a good source of vitamin C. Little known is that passionfruit actually provides a decent amount of iron for a fruit.

How to prep passionfruit for cooking

If you’re using passionfruit pulp in a recipe, seeds and all, simply cut the fruit in half and scoop out the seeded pulp. Each medium sized passionfruit will yield about 1 1/2 tablespoons of pulp. For 1 cup of pulp you will need about 12 passionfruit.

If you don’t want seeds in your passionfruit curd for example, you can scoop the pulp into a fine sieve over a bowl and press the pulp and juice through.

Can’t wait to get started? Try these bright and fresh passionfruit recipes now.

Classic Vanilla Slice with Passionfruit Icing

 

Passionfruit Curd and Coconut Meringue Jars

 

Tangy Passionfruit Sauce – Australian Passionfruit

 

Passionfruit Tart – Australian Passionfruit

Eton mess with tangy passionfruit sauce – Australian Passionfruit

 

Passionfruit Yoyo’s – Western Star

This feature contains a mix of content from  myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post Cook’s guide to passionfruit appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to make an omelette for brunch

Wed, 06/12/2019 - 14:25

They say that the mark of a chef is how well they can make an omelette. But that doesn’t mean you need to be a chef to make one. Making an omelette is actually very easy. Simply follow our basic omelette recipe. We’ve also made a step by step video on how to make an omelette.

Types of omelettes

• Basic Omelette: You need just 3 ingredients to make a basic omelette recipe – eggs, milk and butter. Getting the ratio of milk to egg right is half the battle. The butter is that

• Omelette with Fillings: Once you’ve nailed the basic omelette technique, adding fillings is the fun part. We love a classic sautéed mushroom and cheese filling. Other ideas include cooked chopped bacon or ham, smoked salmon, spinach, feta and herbs.

• Soufflé Omelette: If you’re feeling a little fancier or for a special brunch occasion, you can take the omelette next level by making a soufflé omelette. The name makes it sound harder than it actually is. The main difference is that you separate the eggs and whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks before folding them into the omelette mixture resulting in a lighter than light and fluffy omelette. Voila! 

How to make an omelette video

Check out how easy making an omelette is. Included in this video is 2 ways with – a basic omelette recipe and a filled omelette with mushrooms.

 

 

 

How to Make an Omelette

 

Mushroom Soufflé Omelette

 

*DISCLAIMER – Australian Eggs is a contributing  recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Australian Eggs and our own opinions.  Find more about Australian Eggs. 

 

 

The post How to make an omelette for brunch appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Why you should make tonight ‘date’ night

Wed, 06/12/2019 - 10:29

So, you’re craving something that feels a little naughty but that is actually really nice? We’ve got just the fruit for you – fresh dates. They’re the magic ingredient in better-for-you and raw desserts and bliss balls. The nutritional benefits of dates are many.

Plus, with Middle Eastern cooking being the flavour ‘du jour’, it would be rude not to add dates to your weeknight meal. Here’s a few recipes and reasons that will further convince you to make tonight, ‘date’ night.

Benefits of dates

High in dietary fibre, dates are a great fruit to add to your children’s diet if they’re not getting enough fibre. Dates are also a good source of vitamin B6 and antioxidants. They contain minerals including potassium and magnesium.

However, as with some other nutrient-dense foods, dates are higher in calories so moderation is key. It is a semi-dried fruit after all.

In saying that, dates are used in the place of white and processed sugar in better for you desserts and raw treats such as bliss balls and slices.

Best date recipes

Dates add their delicious caramel flavour to both sweet and savoury dishes. Here’s our pick of the recipes you should be cooking on your ‘date’ night.

 

Rustic Free Form Moroccan Chicken Pie – Lilydale

 

No-bake choc-caramel slice – Copha

 

Get the recipe for this delicious Vegan Avocado Cheesecake recipe here.

Moroccan Style Mushroom and Lamb – Australian Mushrooms

 

 

Weet-Bix Breakfast Cookies – Foodbank

Get the recipe for the Raw Avocado Slice recipe here.

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post Why you should make tonight ‘date’ night appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

NEW Winter foodbook with hearty winter recipes

Fri, 06/07/2019 - 13:23

When it begins snowing in Queensland, you know it’s time for our annual Winter foodbook. Packed full of delicious new dinner recipes and desserts, it’s FREE to download now. Right on time for the long weekend, so you can warm the house with hearty winter recipes.

To get your copy of the book, you can download the ebook now or complete the survey and get your very own printed version delivered to you. Find more information below.

Inside the Winter foodbook 

Whether you’re looking for weeknight dinner recipes that can be ready in 30 minutes or less, family meals that even your fussiest child will polish off, or something special to show off your skills on the weekend, you’ll find it in Winter.

Here’s a little look inside.

Chap 1: Family Faves

These are the dishes that bring everyone to the table, and keeps them coming back for more.

Chap 2: Weeknight Winners

No time to mess around with tricky recipes? No worries. These meals are fabulous and fuss free.

Chap 3: Weekend Wow!

These recipes might need a little extra effort or time, but trust us, they’re worth it.

 

Chap 4: Sweet Slice

Indulge in a winter treat such as a chocolate brownie, a berry crumble or a self-saucing pud.

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post NEW Winter foodbook with hearty winter recipes appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Pumpkin recipes you want to cook now

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 15:10

Pumpkin soup recipes are starting to pop up on your social feeds, on magazine covers and haunting your thoughts, so you know it’s winter and prime pumpkin season. So we’ve picked a handful of pumpkin recipes that are perfect for cooking now.

But before we whet your appetite with delicious recipes, here’s a little info on the types of pumpkin, how to cut pumpkins, the health benefits and more.

Know your pumpkins

When it comes to cooking with pumpkin, it’s great to have a guide, as the flesh of some pumpkins is too moist to be roasted and some, too dry.

Queensland Blue Pumpkin

 

Queensland Blue Pumpkin

The Queensland Blue pumpkin is a large variety with a grey/blue skin and golden flesh. It ranges from 2-5kg. The Queensland Blue is a dry variety making it great for baking and boiling

Butternut Pumpkin

 

 

Butternut Pumpkin

The Butternut Pumpkin has light orange skin with an oblong shape. It’s very narrow, making it easy to cut. The Butternut is a great variety for roasting and does not need to be peeled.

 

Golden Nugget

 

Golden Nugget Pumpkin

The Golden Nugget pumpkin is a small variety of heirloom pumpkin, it rarely reaches more than a 15cm diameter. It has a dark orange outer and light orange flesh making it great for stuffing or decorating around halloween

 

Jarrahdale pumpkin

 

Jarrahdale Pumpkin

The Jarrahdale pumpkin is grey in colour and is semi ribbed. It has moist deep orange flesh, making it ideal for boiling and not great for baking. It is currently the most popular variety of pumpkin.

 

Kent Pumpkin

 

Kent Pumpkin

The Kent Pumpkin is smaller than most varieties, it ranges from 1-3kg. It has green and yellow skin with a golden yellow flesh. It’s very sweet taste is great for quiches, salads or soup. This pumpkin is also sometimes referred to as a ‘Jap’ pumpkin.

How to pick and store pumpkin
  • Choose a firm pumpkin that has no major bruises. Small visual imperfections are fine as pumpkin skin is tough and will protect the flesh.
  • Keep pumpkin at room temperature. Make sure it is dry and away from immediate moisture.
  • It is also a good idea to keep pumpkin away from fruits like apples and pears as they release ethylene gas which can shorten the shelf life of your pumpkin.
  • Fresh pumpkin will last anywhere between 2-3 months.
  • Once cut and stored in the fridge, pumpkin will last 2-3 days.
Tips for cutting pumpkin
  • Use a large serrated knife to cut pumpkin as the flesh can make it hard to cut through with a regular knife.
  • Start by cutting the pumpkin in half and then remove the pumpkin seeds with a large spoon and set aside if you wish to use them.
  • Then place the pumpkin on its flat side to ensure that it is stable and cut into desired size pieces.
Pumpkin recipes you want to cook right now

Spicy Chestnut, Pumpkin and Pancetta Soup

 

Roast Pumpkin and Spinach Risotto

 

Roast Honey Pumpkin

 

Beef Korma with Pumpkin and Beans

 

Chermoula Chicken Pumpkin Tagine with Almond Pilaf

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

The post Pumpkin recipes you want to cook now appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

5 ways to eat avocados in winter

Mon, 06/03/2019 - 18:10

Smashed, blended or sliced, Aussie avocados are a powerhouse ingredient that can be added to any number of sweet and savoury dishes. Although we associate avocados with summer salads, there are many ways to eat avocados during the cooler months. Here are 5 ways to eat avocados in winter.

Avo good one

Not only are avocados utterly delicious, they’re also jam-packed with nutrients. Loaded with fibre, hearty fats and more than 20 vitamins and minerals, each avocado lends its unique blend of goodness to your meals.

During winter, when it’s doubly important to boost your immune system, add avocados to your comfort food recipes. That’s right, sliced or smashed, avocados make everything better, and better for you.

Ways to eat avocados in winter

Why not add a spoonful of guacamole to a hearty chilli con carne, or try adding avocado to your next soup. Avocados add a touch of vibrant colour and a rich and creamy texture to your meals. A more decadent way to enjoy avocados in winter is to add them to your desserts such as brownies or cakes.  Here are 5 ways to eat avocados in winter.

1. Make a breakfast pizza

Forget smashed avo on toast, this is the true breakfast of champions. A brekky pizza with the lot – egg, bacon, roast tomatoes and smashed avo.

2. Baked in a parmigiana

Add some green to your next chicken parmi. Top your schnitty with slices of avocado, sprinkle with cheese and bake it for the ultimate parmi experience.

Easy Avocado Parmigiana – Australian Avocados

3. Toss through spicy roast vegetables

For a flavoursome side or a hearty lunch, toss chunks of avocado with warming Moroccan spices including dukkah, then toss with roast carrots and sweet potatoes for a spicy salad.

Warm Moroccan Avocado and Roasted Vegetable Salad – Australian Avocados

4. Bake into a cake

For a super-moist afternoon teacake that’s dairy-free, just add some mashed avo. This Dairy-free Lemon Avocado Pound Cake has a velvety texture and a delicate flavour. The coconut icing tops it all off nicely. Check it out.

5. Add it to roast chook

Winter weeknights just got easier, and tastier, with this one-pan chicken, avocado and crisp potato tray bake. So lemony, so good.

Chicken, Avocado and Crunchy Potato Tray Bake

 

*DISCLAIMER: Australian Avocados is a contributing  recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. All opinions in this article are our own. For further information on visit  Australian Avocados

The post 5 ways to eat avocados in winter appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to use the whole vegetable: root to stem cooking

Sat, 06/01/2019 - 09:38

It can be easy to throw away the parts of the vegetable you don’t usually cook with. Especially if you’re in a dinner prep frenzy, trying to get dinner on the table quickly as you can!

Root-to-stem cooking is now being touted as one of the hottest trends of 2018, because not only does it encourage mindful cooking and is working towards the reduction of food waste, but it also ensures that we utilise the nutrients in the stems and peels of the fruits and vegetables too.

Also root-to-stem cooking will help reduce your grocery bill. If you use all parts of the plants in cooking, there will be less waste and less need to buy more ingredients to make up for the part that gets tossed out.

Those carrot tops, broccoli stalks, potato skins, ends of greens that are usually thrown away, are actually very useful in cooking.

What vegetables and their parts can you use 
  • Asparagus ends
  • Beet greens
  • Potato peels
  • Broccoli stalks and leaves
  • Carrot tops
  • Cauliflower stems and leaves
  • Celery heart and leaves
  • Chard and silverbeet stems
  • Fennel stalks and fronds
  • Leek greens
  • Radish leaves
  • Pumpkin skins
Ways to use the remaining parts of the veg

Soup

An easy way to use the whole veg is in soup. Asparagus ends and leftover beet greens especially add flavour and a nutritional boost to soup. Soups are also a great way to sneak in a lot of veggies for fussy eaters.

Vegetable stock 

Using the stems of broccoli, potato peels, cauliflower stems and leaves and even carrot tops to make a vegetable stock is another great way to use the whole veg. It’s also a great way to use up any veg past its prime in your crisper drawer. Throw it all in a pot with some water and let it simmer away. If you don’t need the stock right away, freeze it for later use.

Roasting

Potato skins are extremely delicious roasted. They turn into crunchy potato chips. So next time you’re making mashed potato, don’t throw out the skins. Toss them in olive oil and keep in the fridge until you’re ready to roast them.

Also, you will do no harm in roasting the whole pumpkin, skin and all. It’s packed with nutrients you won’t get in the flesh.

Sautéed 

Beet greens are extremely delicious sautéed, and make for a great accompaniment to any nourish bowl or warm salad.

Sauces

Blending up fresh herbs is an easy way to use up a leftover bunch is wilting in the fridge. The result, is a flavourful condiment to steak, salads, or savoury breakfasts.

Stir fries 

Stir fries have no rules, so using the whole veg is absolutely fine. Broccoli stalks are fantastic in a stir fry, they add a lovely crunch and flavour. Also chop up a whole leek and add it to the base of your stir- fry. Delicious.

 

 

Recipes to try 

Chestnut, spinach and green pea soup – Australian Chestnuts

 

Mushroom, Beef and Noodle Stir-Fry – Australian Mushrooms

 

Loaded sweet potato skins – Western Star

 

Roasted Mushroom and Cauliflower Soup – Australian Mushrooms

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

The post How to use the whole vegetable: root to stem cooking appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Zesty lemon recipes for winter

Thu, 05/30/2019 - 12:32

When the cold weather hits, and the winter sniffles arrive, we instinctively reach for lemons. That’s because lemons provide lots of lovely health benefits in fighting colds and flus. Lemons also lend their zesty flavour to these sweet and savoury lemon recipes for winter.

Health benefits of lemons

It’s widely known that lemons are a great source of vitamin C. One whole lemon will provide about 50% of your daily recommended intake of vitamin C.

Lemons can also help with the absorption of iron from plant-based foods such as legumes, lentils, green beans and peas as well as soy-based foods such as tofu. This can help people on vegetarian diets to avoid anaemia.

Lemon recipes for winter

Here are some delicious sweet and savoury lemon recipes to try this winter.

Lemon coconut slice – Copha

 

Get the recipe for this Lemon Chicken, Avocado and Crunchy Potato Tray Bake here.

 

Slow Roasted Lamb Shoulder with Garlic, Lemon & Rosemary Marinade – Breville

Dairy-free Lemon Avocado Pound Cake – Australian Avocados

 

Chargrilled Asparagus and Tomato Fettuccine with King Prawns and Lemon Herb Butter – Perfect Italiano

 

Lemon Meringue Pie – Fairy

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

 

The post Zesty lemon recipes for winter appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Can a gluten-free diet help you lose weight?

Tue, 05/28/2019 - 10:15
Welcome to the third in our “Eat Well” article series. Here Accredited Practising Dietitian and founder of The Naked Truth, Rachel Hawkins weighs in on that trending debate, can a gluten-free diet help you lose weight?

Thanks to the gluten-free health trend, gluten-free products are in demand more now than ever before. Whether you’re at the supermarket or your local café, gluten-free food and beverage options are readily available.

We know that following a gluten-free diet is essential for the medical treatment of Coeliac Disease (an autoimmune condition in which the immune system reacts abnormally to gluten), but what about everyone else? The word on the health food aisle is that some people believe that a gluten-free diet will help them lose weight… but is this true?

What is gluten?

• Gluten is the name given to a group of proteins called prolamins and glutelinins that are stored together with starch in the endosperm of grains (that’s the part of the grain we eat).

• Gluten is most commonly found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye, however is also present in hybrid grain varieties such as spelt and triticale.

• Gluten can also be found in more unsuspecting products such as deli meats, sauces, marinades, ready-made meals, alcohol, flavoured milks and confectionary items, to name a few.

• Gluten is well-known for its elastic properties which give structure to baked goods such as bread, cakes and biscuits.

So how does a gluten-free diet differ from a regular diet?

Research tells us that a gluten-free diet is typically based on a combination of foods naturally lacking gluten (examples include gluten-free grains, fruits and vegetables) and special products which have been formulated with gluten-free grains. Because the elastic properties of gluten are so hard to replicate, gluten-free products undergo significant food processing.

As a result of trying to replicate the properties of gluten, gluten-free products are typically higher in fat, sugar and calorie content, meaning that they are more likely to contribute to weight gain rather than weight loss.

In fact, studies indicate that people who follow a gluten-free diet are more likely to consume a high amount of packaged gluten-free products compared to wholefoods, which naturally lack gluten, due to the perception of having limited food choices.

Due to the fact that most gluten-free products are made with refined flour and/or starches, they are also low in fibre. This is unfavourable for weight loss, as foods that contain fibre promote satiety and keep us feeling fuller for longer.

Therefore, it can be argued that a gluten-free diet may actually increase the probability of consuming excess energy, resulting in weight gain.

So, can a gluten-free diet help you lose weight?

The question of whether a gluten-free diet will help you lose weight or not all comes down to the overall quality of your diet. If you consume a gluten-free diet that consists predominately of packaged and processed foods, which we know are typically high in sugar, fat and calories, then chances are that this will not bode favourably on your waist line.

However, if you eat a diet that is rich in naturally occurring gluten-free foods such as gluten-free wholegrains, fruits, vegetables, lean protein, dairy, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, then there is no need to fear weight gain as a result of a gluten-free prognosis.

So, it’s decided. A gluten-free diet will not help you lose weight. It is, in fact, an inclusive and well-balanced diet that will assist in weight loss. A gluten-free diet presents both practical and nutritional challenges to those who must follow it. Accordingly a gluten-free diet should only be followed by people who have a clinically diagnosed allergy or intolerance to gluten.

Gluten-free recipes to try

Frittata Caprese with spinach, tomato and ricotta – Australian Eggs

Avocado Cabbage Salad – Australian Avocados

GET THE RECIPE

 

Cauliflower pizza with pesto, summer veggies and ricotta – Perfect Italiano

 

Nectarine and Apricot Coconut Chia Puddings – Summer Stonefruit

GET THE RECIPE

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

Part of this feature contains content written by the author which first appeared on  www.noshable.org

 

The post Can a gluten-free diet help you lose weight? appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Immune boosting cauliflower recipes

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 15:11

Cauliflower is one of the cheapest ways to get all your nutrients this season. Plus it’s the ideal veggie smuggler that can be beautifully disguised in mac and cheese, magically blended into cauliflower rice mashed into a pizza base or transformed into delicious fritters.

Immune boosting cauliflower

Cauliflowers are a cruciferous vegetable (don’t worry, you don’t need to pronounce it) so it’s very high in vitamins and antioxidants and other amazing nutrients that will help give your immune system a boost during winter.

How to pick

Cauliflower is available all year round but is in peak right now. When selecting, ensure that the florets are tightly packed together and firm to touch and there is no greyish tinge to the florets. Look for leaves that are lively.

How to store

For maximum quality when cooking with cauliflower, use this vegetable within five days of purchasing. Make sure to keep it in the crisper section of your fridge for optimum freshness. For extra convince, pre-cut cauliflower into small florets and store these in an airtight container in the fridge, so it’s ready to go when you are.

How to cut cauliflower into florets
  1. Using a large knife, cut the cauliflower into quarters.
  2. Remove the stem of the cauliflower by slicing from the top of the stem to the bottom.
  3. Large florets should fall away from the stem once removed. You can then cut these into floret sizes of your choosing.
Nutrition 
  • 1 Serve = 75 g of cauliflower (or about 8 florets)
  • 1 serve provides you with 10% of the RDI (recommended daily intake) of Fibre, Potassium, Folate and Vitamin K
  • 1 serve provides you with 25% of the RDI of Vitamin C
Cooking ideas

Cauliflower cheese has got to be the ultimate cauliflower recipe. It’s creamy, cheesy, comforting and is the perfect side dish to pair with a table of moorish food at a family occasion.

This may have been the recipe that started our love affair with cauliflower but it certainly doesn’t end there. There are so many great ways to use cauliflower in cooking. Here are some delicious and unique ways we have been cooking with cauliflower.

Roasted Mushroom and Cauliflower Soup – Australian Mushrooms

 

Get the recipe for One-Pan Butter Chicken with Cauliflower 

 

Cheesy Chicken, Cauliflower and Broccoli Rice Bake

 

Roast Cauliflower and Egg Salad with Avocado Dressing – Australian Eggs

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

 

The post Immune boosting cauliflower recipes appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to Make Chocolate Orange Brioche Bread Pudding

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 11:56

*SPONSORED POST: This is a featured post for Western Star; a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Western Star and our own opinions.  Find out more about the full range of Western Star products.

How to Make Chocolate Orange Bread Pudding

Winter is here and with it comes the season for delectable warming desserts and for us, there’s nothing quite like taking a classic and putting a special little spin on it.

If you love the Jaffa flavour combination of chocolate and orange, then this pudding is set to become your favourite this season.  And it’s oh, so easy!

Top tips on how to make a chocolate orange bread pudding
  1. Pick up a loaf of pre-sliced brioche bread. Brioche is readily available in most supermarkets these days. It has a lovely soft texture, however you can substitute for white bread if you prefer or if you can’t find brioche
  2. We recommend using pre-sliced bread as it will ensure more even cooking
  3. To assemble, spread the slices on both sides with Western Star Spreadable, then spread only one side with marmalade, cut into triangle halves and place marmalade side up, overlapping into a baking dish. Those crusts will get a lovely little crunch to them too
  4. Make your custard in a jug and be sure to pour evenly from front to back over the bread, dot the pudding with chocolate chunks and then let stand for 10 minutes to allow the bread to soak up the custard

This pudding will take around 50-60 minutes to cook.  Check the pudding at the 50-minute mark to see if custard has just set which you can test by giving the dish a small shake.  If no liquid appears it’s ready. Otherwise cook for a further 10 minutes to be sure.

Choc-orange Bread and Butter Pudding

 

 

*DISCLAIMER: Western Star is a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Western Star and our own opinions.  Find out more about the full range of Western Star products.

 

 

The post How to Make Chocolate Orange Brioche Bread Pudding appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Super Easy One Pot Chicken and Potatoes Recipe for Dinner

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 11:14

*SPONSORED POST: This is a featured post for Western Star; a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Western Star and our own opinions.  Find out more about the full range of Western Star products.

Super Easy One Pot Chicken and Potatoes Recipe for Dinner

You love a good roast, but it can be a bit same-same. If you feel the time has come to change up your roast chicken dinner your search is over! This Creamy One Pot Roast Chicken takes just a few simple steps and minimal fuss and it’s all made in one pan.

How to make the best one pot roast chicken

A top tip for quicker, even cooking, is to use a butterflied chicken which you can buy from most supermarkets or you can ask your butcher to prepare for you.

A simple flavour base is made by combining Western Star Spreadable with thyme, lemon rind and garlic in a small bowl, which is spread over a butterflied chicken that sits on top of chopped leeks.  Cook for 30 minutes, then add chopped baby chat potatoes and pour over a creamy mixture made using thickened cream, stock, mustard and brown sugar.  Cook for another 45 minutes and the result is a perfectly golden roast chicken and flavour packed creamy potatoes with leeks that serves a family of four.

If you prefer your sauce to be a little thicker, transfer the chicken and potatoes to a plate and cover loosely with foil to keep warm.  Combine 2 teaspoons cornflour with 2 tablespoons of water in a cup.  Stir into sauce over medium heat until sauce thickens.

 

Creamy One Pot Roast Chicken

 

*DISCLAIMER: Western Star is a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Western Star and our own opinions.  Find out more about the full range of Western Star products.

 

 

 

 

The post Super Easy One Pot Chicken and Potatoes Recipe for Dinner appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

This foodbook has your weeknight dinners sorted

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 09:09

Getting good food on the table quickly and easily is high on most people’s list. Not only that, you want it to be tasty and nutritious. Now that’s a lot of oranges to juggle. That’s why we created this new foodbook 30 Minute Meals. It’s filled with recipes that are ready in 30 minutes or less, including weeknight dinners.

30 Minute Meals foodbook

Inside the free downloadable foodbook, you’ll find more than 25 recipes, tips and hints broken down into chapters including:

  1. Breakfast & Brunch – Whether you’re up for a lazy weekend or busy weekday, start as you mean to go on with these recipes.
  2. Love your Leftovers – Having leftovers is like money in the bank. Use up spag bol, ham and roast veg in these delicious meals.
  3. Easy & Light – These recipes may be easy and light but they all deliver a full-flavour hit. Guaranteed to satisfy.
  4. Street Eats – For those nights when you’re craving Asian flavours like a pad Thai, teriyaki chicken or butter chicken.
  5. 30-Minute Dinner Winners – These are the recipes that will be on high rotation during the week for clean plates all round.

Here’s a little sneak peak into the book to whet your appetite.

 

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

The post This foodbook has your weeknight dinners sorted appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

How to Make Creamy Instant Polenta with Mushroom Ragu

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 11:40

 

Good creamy polenta can really take a meal from good to great, but the thought of making polenta for a weeknight meal can be a turn off. Regular polenta can take around 40 minutes to cook properly, so this is the time to embrace the short-cut and use instant polenta as it’s much quicker and easier to make.

How to make creamy instant polenta

In this recipe the process couldn’t be easier; simply combine milk and stock and bring it to the boil, then reduce the heat to medium and gradually add the polenta stirring constantly for around 3 minutes (much better than 40!), until the polenta is soft and smooth. To finish, add Western Star Spreadable and shredded parmesan while still warm and presto you have a pot of perfect polenta!

Another top tip to keep in mind; if your polenta is thick rather than creamy, you can use a little extra hot milk to thin it down until you get the consistency you like. But remember, just like salt, you can always add more milk, but you can’t take it out so be sure to only add a little a time.

Now that you’ve perfected your instant polenta cooking skills, you can complete the dish with a classic Mushroom Ragu and you’ve got yourself a delightfully easy vegetarian meal in around 30 minutes, perfect for any day of the week.

 

 

Mushroom Ragu with Creamy Polenta

PRODUCT WATCH

Western Star Spreadable Original Soft, has a creamy flavour that makes food taste great.  Made from premium Australian Dairy, you can use spreadable straight from the fridge making it perfect for creamy recipes like this Polenta and Mushroom Ragu.

 

*DISCLAIMER: Western Star is a contributing recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Western Star and our own opinions.  Find out more about the full range of Western Star products.

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Last-minute Mother’s Day recipes

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 12:53

Start Mum’s day off right by showing off your cooking skills and preparing a delicious breakfast for her to indulge in. And if you need a little helping hand, here are some fabulous last-minute Mother’s Day recipes to whip up. They’re sure to impress.

Last-minute Mother’s Day recipes to try now

Whether your mum loves a savoury brekky or has a sweeter tooth, we’ve got the dish that will make her day extra special.

And the best thing about these recipes, is that they can be made made on Mother’s Day and ready from whoa to go in just 30 minutes.

Creamy Mushroom Croque Madame – Australian Eggs

 

Basic Pancakes – Australian Eggs

Three Smashing Smoothies

Three Avocado Smoothies – Australian Avocados

 

Egg and Smoked Trout Croissant – Australian Eggs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook third party content partners and our own opinions.

 

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How to Cook Chestnuts

Thu, 05/09/2019 - 08:00

Chestnuts make a great snack and can be cooked using many easy methods.

 

Chestnuts are intoxicating in both aroma and taste- their sweet, earthy flavour, accompanied by a texture that is both gratifyingly crumbly and velvety smooth, is nothing short of unique. Unlike other nuts, they are only eaten cooked and have a distinct nutritional profile- low in fat, high in fibre and rich in Vitamin C! While they make great accompaniments to many dishes, both savoury and sweet, there is nothing more satisfying than enjoying chestnuts in all their authenticity- warm, unadorned and whole! This simple how-to guide shows you that an open-fire is not the only way to cook these delicious, nutty gems.

Preparing 

Before cooking, rinse the chestnuts in cold water and dry them off. It is imperative to always slit the outer shell of a chestnut, in order to prevent it from bursting, during the cooking process (all methods). Lie the chestnut on its’ flat side, then using a small knife make a shallow long slit crosswise over the top. The cut should go through the full thickness of the shell, but not so deep that it penetrates the flesh.

Always remember to score chestnuts before cooking in order to prevent the shell from bursting.

Cooking Methods

Oven Roasted

Roasting chestnuts in the oven is generally the most common method of cooking, as it is simple and offers a roasted richness- similar to that of an open fire. Preheat the oven to approximately 200°C. Place the chestnuts in a large baking tray (ensure not to overcrowd) and cook for 10-15 minutes or until the slits have started to open.

An open fire is not a necessity when roasting chestnuts. Try them roasted in the oven or in a pan- much easier!

Pan Roasted

Cooking chestnuts in a pan will also give them a smoky flavour. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium heat, and then add the chestnuts in a single layer. Cook for approximately 15 minutes, or until tender, ensuring to give the pan a good shake every few minutes.

Boil

Boiling is another easy and quick way to cook chestnuts. While it won’t give them a roasted smokiness, boiling chestnuts is a great way to keep the flesh tender and creamy. It is also a good method to apply if the variety of chestnuts you are using is difficult to peel. Place the prepared chestnuts in a pan of cold water. Bring to the boil and simmer for approximately 15-20 minutes, or until tender.

Boiling is a quick and easy way to cook chestnuts.

Microwave

Place 6 to 8 prepared chestnuts in a single layer on a microwave-safe plate. Cook on high for one-minute intervals, until tender.

Peeling

Once finished cooking (all methods, except for boiling), wrap the chestnuts in a tea towel and leave for 10 minutes (this will make the peeling process easier). Once they are cool enough to handle, peel away the shells and skin.

If boiled, there’s no need to wrap the chestnuts in a tea towel; simply remove the chestnuts one at a time from the water to peel.

 

Handy Hint: Chestnuts are much easier to peel when they are warm- so don’t leave them waiting for too long!

While, chestnuts are deliciously satisfying on their own, they also marry perfectly with many other ingredients and work an absolute treat in a variety of dishes.

This tutorial is also helpful:

 

Here are a few chestnuts  recipes you can try at home!

 

Chestnut & Mushroom Soup

Chestnut Italian sausage and fennel spaghetti

Roasted Asian- Style Chicken with Chestnut

Sweet Chestnut Cream

 

 

The post How to Cook Chestnuts appeared first on myfoodbook | Food Stories.

Eating avocados makes you happy

Wed, 04/10/2019 - 15:13

It’s easy eating green, especially when your green of choice is an avocado. Whether whizzed in a smoothie, mashed to make a lemon tea cake or sliced and added to cheesy quesadillas, avos bring their unique blend of good fats and nutrients. Find out how eating avocados makes you happy.

Hass Vs Shepard

You’ve probably noticed that Shepard avocados – the smoother, green-skinned avocado – are around at the moment. They’ll be in supermarkets and green grocers until about May. But don’t worry, the trusty Hass avocado will be rocking around to see you through winter. Both varieties of avocado have the same nutritional content so choose whatever’s ripe and ready.

Here’s a quick guide on how to tell when your avocado is ready to eat.

What are the benefits of eating avocado? 

According to Australian Avocados, Avocados are rich in healthy, good fats. They are the only fruit, apart from olives, to contain monounsaturated fats.

Healthy fats help you absorb essential fat-soluble nutrients (such as vitamin E), reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, help maintain heart health, promote healthy skin and are great for the waistline.

In fact, research has found that people who eat avocado weigh less, have a lower BMI and a smaller waist than people who avoided the delicious fruit.5

How can eating avocados make you happy?

Avocados contain a brain-loving bundle of nutrients that help put you in a good mood, boost your energy levels and fight fatigue – talk about the ultimate food to kickstart your day!

It’s all down to the combination of niacin, folate, potassium, vitamin B5 and C that help your brain and nervous system perform at its best.

Here are some happy meals (aka avocado recipes) to boost your mood

Asian Chick-ado Patties

GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

Three Avocado Smoothies – Australian Avocados

Grilled Avocados Two Ways

GET THE RECIPE HERE

 

Dairy-Free Lemon Avocado Pound Cake – Australian Avocados

 

BBQ Lamb with Avocado Chimichurri Dressing – Australian Avocados

 

 

 

*DISCLAIMER: Australian Avocados is a contributing  recipe Partner at myfoodbook.com.au. All opinions in this article are our own. For further information on Australian Avocados, visit http://avocado.org.au

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10 kitchen chores you can do in 60 seconds

Thu, 04/04/2019 - 08:37

If your kitchen is craving a little tidy, there is no need to get on your hands and knees and start scrubbing. You can spruce up your kitchen with little blitzes of work.

Even the busiest commercial kitchen runs by the ethos that you ‘clean as you go’ and ‘keep your worktops’ clean. This also relates to your home kitchen. Messy accidents happen when there’s clutter or mess around – “who forgot to put the lid on the soy…” –  so though we have no doubt most of you are domestic goddesses, we’ve put together a little hit list you can leave around for when it’s Mr Foodbook’s turn to cook. Here’s our top tips to keep your kitchen tip top!

Wipe down the tap

Most likely not on top of your priority list but when your kitchen tap shines, it’ll look super clean.

Spot-sweep

There are certain spots that can get especially messy on your kitchen floor or the whole floor can sometimes look like tip. But after cooking grab your dustpan or hand broom and quickly pick up those nasty crumbs or bits of food.

 Put away dry dishes 

For some reason random dishes seem to gather next to the kitchen sink. Take the time and put them back where they belong to clear more space and declutter your kitchen counter.

Wipe down your sink 

It’s that simple but giving your kitchen sink a quick wipe down with a multipurpose cleaner will remove any stains and other random gunk.

Image cred: Lauren Volo

Wipe the microwave 

Although no one is regularly and attentively looking into the microwave, if you lightly clean your microwave regularly, it won’t need a time-consuming deep clean later.

Spot-clean your chairs

Once the family dinner rush is done, give the chairs a quick wipe down to ensure no food is left behind.

Tidy up your bench 

It’s amazing how quickly your kitchen can become a hub for “stuff”. Take the time and return everything back to it’s regular spot or make room for it in a cupboard or drawer.

Wipe down the fridge doors

Greasy and stick hands are constantly running over the fridge, so when everyone has cleared out of the kitchen, give the fridge a light wipe down.

Image cred: Lauren Volo

Take out the rubbish

A full bin can really limit what you can do in the kitchen and you run the risk of letting empty bottles and packaging pile up on the counter. It won’t take more than a minute to refresh your bin.

Put things back where they belong 

Similar to tidying your kitchen bench but as you cook put things back where they belong. Put the salt and pepper, other spices and oils back once your done with them. Or when you have finished cooking return everything to it’s normal position so items don’t pile up.

 

 

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The health benefits of pears

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 11:02

A perfect pear is a thing of beauty. A casual cluster of pears on a dish on your dining table looks, well, good enough to eat. And eat you should, because this gorgeous fruit not only looks good but delivers on flavour. Especially when its just ripe. Slightly crunchy but ever so juicy. And you don’t need to limit yourself to eating pears as they come, add them to salads, cakes and savoury bakes and see them shine.

Before you start cooking with pears, here’s some tips about how to store, ripen prepare and cook with them. Plus all the delicious health benefits of pears.

How to pick

When picking a pear, keep your purpose in mind. If you are purchasing pears for a future recipe, choose one that is firmer to ensure it isn’t too soft when the time comes.

If you simply want to pick a pear for immediate eating, lightly press the pear on its stem. You want it to give slightly but not be too plush. Also have a look for any large bruises. A pear has tender flesh, so a bruise particularly on a softer fruit will indicate over ripeness.

How to store

To ripen a pear, store out of direct sunlight at room temperature. To speed up the process keep your pears in a brown paper bag. Once ripened, it is best to keep your fruit in the fridge.

How to ripen

But before you pluck a pear form the fruit bowl and get disappointed that it’s still too hard to enjoy, in the infographic below, you will find tips on how to ripen a pear, an easy way to test if a pear is ripe, the different pear varieties and when each pear variety is in season. If you didn’t know much about pears before, you’ll be an ex-peart after viewing this guide.

How to cut

Wash pears lightly in cool water and pat down with a dry cloth removing any moisture. Depending on what you wish to do with your pear, these are the two main preparation methods.

  1. Slicing – This style is great for salads, tarts, pizza or sandwiches.
  • Cut pears in half lengthways with a large utility knife
  • Using a melon baller, remove the core by scooping from the top of the pears stem to the bottom
  • Then lay the pear on its flat side, cutting slice widths of your choosing

2. Segmenting – This is great for poaching, roasting or glazing pears.

  • Start by peeling pears
  • Cut pears in half lengthways and then once again lengthways with a large utility knife
  • Using a melon baller, remove the core by scooping from the top of the pears stem to the bottom
The health benefits of pears

A pear is the perfect snack. High in fibre and low-GI, a pear will keep you feeling fuller for longer and is brimming with vitamin C.

 

Pear recipes to try 

Peanut butter and nut pear wedges – Australian Pears

 

Chocolate pear loaf

GET THE RECIPE

 

Pear and super grain salad – Australian Pears

 

Mini sponge cakes with pears and salted caramel sauce

GET THE RECIPE

 

Pear and Brussel Sprout Slaw – Australian Pears

 

*DISCLAIMER –  Australian Pears is a contributing recipe Partner at  myfoodbook.com.au. This feature includes a mix of content sourced from Australian Pears and our own opinions.   Find out more about Australian Pears 

 

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8 easy autumn dinners you’ll love

Wed, 03/20/2019 - 17:23

You may not be ready to chuck the cover on the barbecue yet. But it’s time to embrace the cooler weather with some hearty, warming dishes that will bring the family together. Think creamy carbonara, spicy curries and golden cheesy bakes, plus seriously slurpable noodle soups. We’ve hand picked these 8 easy autumn dinners you’ll love.

What is it that makes a dish hearty and warming?

While we might not quite be in full ‘comfort food’ mode right now, we’re starting to crave things like carb loaded pastas, a bit of melted cheese action, roasted goodness in whatever the protein or veg, the umami goodness of an Asian noodle soup and creamy dreamy dishes.

Now that we’ve whet your appetite, fulfil your desire with these recipes.

8 easy autumn dishes you’ll love

Sweet Potato Pasta Bake with Spinach and Pine Nuts – Australian Sweet Potatoes

Check out the video below, then get the recipe for the Creamy Fettuccine Carbonara Recipe here

One-pan butter chicken with cauliflower – Passage to India

 

Oven baked chicken and mushroom risotto – Australian Mushrooms

 

 

 

Beef Ramen – Australian Eggs

 

Cauliflower, Pancetta and Pangratto Macaroni Bake – Perfect Italiano

MIni Shepherd’s Pie – Western Star

 

Rustic Free Form Moroccan Chicken Pie – Lilydale

 

This feature contains a mix of content from myfoodbook  third party content partners and our own opinions.

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